By

Megan Bruzan
Shock wave treatment accelerates impaired wound healing in diverse clinical situations. However, the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of shock waves have not yet been fully revealed. Because cell proliferation is a major requirement in the wound healing cascade, we used in vitro studies and an in vivo wound healing model to study whether shock...
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Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) is a form of “mechanotherapy”, that, from its original applications as urological lithotripsy, gained the field of musculo-skeletal diseases as Orthotripsy (mainly tendinopaties and bone regenerative disorders) and Regenerative Medicine as well. Click here to read more.
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High-energy ESW can destroy non myelinated nerves but afterwards there is an even faster regeneration. Click here to read more.
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Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy (ESWT) is broadly used as a non-surgical therapy in various diseases for its pro-angiogenic and anti-inflammatory effects. However, the molecular mechanisms translating tissue exposure to shock waves (SW) in a biological response with potential therapeutic activity are largely unknown. As macrophages take part in both the onset and amplification of the...
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Shock wave treatment (SWT) was shown to induce regeneration of ischaemic myocardium via Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). The antimicrobial peptide LL37 gets released by mechanical stress and is known to form complexes with nucleic acids thus activating Toll-like receptors. We sug- gested that SWT in the acute setting prevents from the development of heart failure via RNA/protein release. Myocardial...
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Nägele et al. 4th ISMST Basic Research Meeting in Vienna, Austria Click here to read more.
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Szwarc et al. 4th ISMST Basic Research Meeting in Vienna, Austria Click here to read more.
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An et al. 4th ISMST Basic Research Meeting in Vienna, Austria Click here to read more.
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